How to Grow Cussonia - Planting & Caring

By Sharon & Team   /   Bush Category   /   2023

Cussonia, also known as cabbage tree, is a genus of 35 species of flowering plants in the family Araliaceae, native to Africa, Madagascar and southern Arabia. They are large shrubs or small to medium-sized trees, growing to 5–20 m tall, with spirally arranged, simple or compound leaves. The flowers are small and borne in dense, branched inflorescences. The fruit is an oval or spherical drupe.

How to Grow Cussonia - Planting & Caring

Growing Easiness

Is it easy to grow Cussonia plant? So, it is best to choose a more experienced grower if you are unsure about your abilities. The Cussonia plant is a great choice for beginner florists. The plant is easy to care for and does not require much experience to grow. However, the plant is not as robust as some of the more experienced growers, so it is best to choose a more experienced grower if you are unsure about your abilities.

Plant Size

How big can it be? Since it is a fast-growing succulent, it can quickly reach up to 7 meters in nature. However, when grown at home, it is usually pruned to 1-2 meters, which gives it a more compact shape.

Growth Rate

How fast is the growth? Sometimes, the leaves are extremely large, up to 50 cm in length and 30 cm in width. The leaf shape is variable, but is typically pinnate with up to seven leaflets. The leaflets are themselves variable in shape, but are usually oblong with toothed margins. The leaflets are arranged in an alternate pattern on the leaf stalk. The leaf stalk is also variable in length, but is typically about as long as the leaflets. The flowers are borne on a tall, branching inflorescence. The flowers are small, greenish-white, and lack petals. The fruit is a small, dark-colored berry. The Cussonia plant is a fast-growing, evergreen shrub that is native to Africa. It is characterized by its large, pinnate leaves and tall, branching inflorescence. The leaves of the Cussonia plant are variable in shape and size, but are typically oblong with toothed margins. The leaf stalk is also variable in length, but is typically about as long as the leaflets. The flowers of the Cussonia plant are small, greenish-white, and lack petals. The fruit of the Cussonia plant is a small, dark-colored berry.

Cussonia Basic Knowledge

Plant Form Bush
Family Aral Sea – Araliaceae
Origin Madagascar, South Africa

Lifespan, Perennial or Annuals

How long is the lifespan? The cussonia plant is a perennial that can live for several years in the right conditions. It is important to provide the plant with adequate water and sunlight to ensure its long life.

Ideal Temperature

What is the ideal temperature? When the temperature is too high, the leaves of the plant will become yellow and fall off. When the temperature is too low, the leaves will become dark and the plant will stop growing.

Humidity

What about the humidity? If you have a Cussonia plant at home, you probably know that it prefers high humidity, 50% or more. This means that you'll need to regularly spray the plant, especially in winter when your heating is on.

Light Requirement

What amount of light this plant needed? The reason why the Cussonia plant prefers bright scattered light is because on the southern window, shading is desirable. The plant should be gradually accustomed to sunlight in the spring so that it can get the light it needs to grow properly.

Soil Composition

What is good soil for Cussonia? So, the cussonia soil should be a mixture of garden earth and sand in a 2:1 ratio. The best way to make sure your cussonia has the right soil is to mix your own. To do this, you'll need two parts garden soil, one part compost, and one part coarse sand or perlite. You can also use a 1:1:1:1 mix of leaf mold, humus, peat, and sand.

Watering Time

How much I must water Cussonia? The Cussonia plant is a native of southern Africa. It is a drought resistant plant that can withstand long periods of dryness. The plant does best in full sun to partial shade. It prefers well-drained soil. The plant is not frost-tolerant. The Cussonia plant is a woody, evergreen shrub that can grow to a height of 6-8 feet. The leaves are dark green, leathery, and deeply lobed. The flowers are small, greenish-white, and borne in clusters. The fruit is a black berry.

Fertilizing and Nutritient

About fertilizer. Common ly called the cabbage tree, the Cussonia is a genus of about 20 species of woody plants native to Africa. They are large shrubs or small trees growing to 5–25 m tall, with spirally arranged leaves. The flowers are small and greenish-white, borne in dense panicles. The fruit is a woody cone 5–20 cm long and 3–10 cm diameter, containing numerous seeds. Cussonia are attractive, drought-tolerant garden plants. They prefer full sun and well-drained soil, and are tolerant of most soil types except very wet or very dry conditions. They are relatively slow-growing, but can be fast-growing in ideal conditions. They can be propagated from seed or semi-ripe cuttings.

Reproduction

How to reproduce Cussonia? The plant reproduces best vegetatively, but this will not result in a caudex (thickened base of the trunk). Seed reproduction is more often used to achieve the caudex. However, seeds lose their germination quickly, so it is best to plant them immediately after ripening. Before planting, the seeds should be soaked in warm water for about half a day. The seeds are then planted in a mixture of peat and sand, pressing them into the substrate. The soil is gently watered by sprinkling it from a spray gun. Shoots appear within a month. The first year, they should not be transplanted. The next year, when transplanting, great care must be taken with the root systems as they are easily injured. Young plants quickly form a caudex.

Bloom

Why Cussonia won't bloom? If you are looking for a plant that will add some beautiful blooms to your garden, then you should consider the Cussonia plant. This plant is known for its pretty flowers, which come in a variety of colors. The blooms of this plant are typically very small, but they can be quite showy. The plant is native to Africa and typically blooms in the summertime. If you are interested in growing this plant, it is important to note that it does require some special care.

Transfer or Repotting

How much I must water Cussonia? Eventually, an adult plant will only need to be transplanted 1 time in 2 to 3 years. This is because the Cussonia plant does not grow too much. When transplanting, use a small, tight pot. This will help to form the plant in the shape of a bonsai. When transplanting, the roots should be placed higher above the soil surface.

Caring The Cussonia

How to care the plant? Because the Cussonia plant grows quite rapidly, it will require regular pruning in order to maintain its shape. In the spring, the shoots can be shortened significantly, and they should also be trimmed during the entire growing season. This will help the plant to retain a more attractive appearance. It is also beneficial to take the plant outdoors in the summer months, either to a balcony or to a garden.

Pests & Challenges

What is the challenge when caring Cussonia plant? Although this plant is a tropical African, it is often grown as a houseplant in temperate regions. It is an evergreen perennial that can grow to tree-like proportions if left unpruned. It has large, compound leaves with leathery, dark green leaflets. The leaflets are arranged in a spiraling pattern up the leaf stem. The leaf margins are toothed, and the leaves have a distinct, unpleasant smell when crushed. The flowers are small, greenish-white, and borne in dense, cylindrical clusters. They are followed by small, black, berry-like fruits.

Toxic & Poisonous Type

Are Cussonia poisonous? If you have a Cussonia plant in your garden, you may want to take care when handling it. The sap of the plant is toxic and can cause skin irritation. If you are allergic to the sap, you may experience a more severe reaction. The plant is also poisonous to animals, so keep it away from pets and children.