How to Grow Hatiora - Planting & Caring

By Sharon & Team   /   Cactus Category   /   2023

Hatiora, also known as Easter cactus, is a genus of epiphytic cacti native to Brazil. The genus name comes from the Greek words for "hat" and "cactus". They are known for their distinctive flowers, which bloom in shades of pink, red, purple, and white. Hatiora are easy to care for and make great houseplants.

How to Grow Hatiora - Planting & Caring

Growing Easiness

Is it easy to grow Hatiora plant? Unless you are purposely trying to kill your Hatiora, this plant is almost impossible to kill. These epiphytes are native to Brazil and have adapted to grow in conditions that would make most other plants perish. They are often found in the rainforest clinging to tree trunks or rocks. In their natural habitat, they receive filtered sunlight and high humidity.

Plant Size

How big can it be? The plant size is from 15-35 cm in length to 5 years of age. Up to 40-50 cm - 1.8 m long by 10 years.

Growth Rate

How fast is the growth? Sometimes, it is stated that the Hatiora Gaertn. (Rhipsalidaceae Juss.) is a epiphytic plant, but in cultivation, it is often seen growing terrestrially. The plant is a native of Brazil, and was first described by Linnaeus in 1753. The genus Hatiora was named by Robert Brown in 1810. The name Hatiora is derived from the Latin word for "brim" or "edge", referring to the margins of the leaves. The specific epithet, gaertneri, is in honor of Brazilian botanist, Joao da Silva Gaertner. The Hatiora Gaertn. is a epiphytic plant that is native to Brazil. The plant was first described by Linnaeus in 1753 and the genus Hatiora was named by Robert Brown in 1810. The name Hatiora is derived from the Latin word for "brim" or "edge", referring to the margins of the leaves. The specific epithet, gaertneri, is in honor of Brazilian botanist, Joao da Silva Gaertner. The Hatiora Gaertn. is a epiphytic plant that is native to Brazil. The plant was first described by Linnaeus in 1753 and the genus Hatiora was named by Robert Brown in 1810. The name Hatiora is derived from the Latin word for "brim" or "edge", referring to the margins of the leaves. The specific epithet, gaertneri, is in honor of Brazilian botanist, Joao da Silva Gaertner.

Hatiora Basic Knowledge

Plant Form Cactus
Family Cactaceae
Origin Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay

Lifespan, Perennial or Annuals

How long is the lifespan? Since they are succulents, they have a much shorter lifespan than most other plants. They live for about 2-5 years. If you want your plant to live longer, you need to give it the proper care.

Ideal Temperature

What is the ideal temperature? Common ly known as the false cactus, Hatiora is a genus of epiphytic and lithophytic cacti native to Brazil. They are easily distinguished from other cacti by their flattened stems, which are often brightly colored and bear leaves only at their tips. The flowers are also large and showy, and come in a variety of colors. Hatioras are tropical plants, and as such, they require warm temperatures to thrive. In the summer, they can tolerate temperatures up to 80.6 degrees Fahrenheit, but as autumn approaches, they will need a lower temperature of 51.8 to 53.6 degrees. This is because lower temperatures are necessary for normal flowering in winter. However, if the temperature rises above 89.6 degrees, the flowers will quickly dry up.

Humidity

What about the humidity? So, the minimum humidity for the plant is 40%. If the temperature is high, then the plant needs to be sprayed with soft water every 2-3 days, but in winter this should be done every 10-12 days.

Light Requirement

What amount of light this plant needed? Because it is a cactus, it needs bright light, but not the direct sunlight, which will scorch the leaves. In the summer, you want to make sure there is shade from the direct sunlight, but in the winter the lighting should be bright.

Soil Composition

What is good soil for Hatiora? So, for a mixture of self-cooking should take equal parts coarse sand or perlite, turf ground, leaf soil, peat. Good drainage is required.

Watering Time

How much I must water Hatiora? The Hatiora or Easter cactus is a plant that belongs to the family of cacti, specifically to the Rhipsalidaceae family. This plant is originally from Brazil, and is a epiphytic cactus, which means that in its natural habitat it grows on other trees or rocks. The Hatiora has flattened stems, which can be green or reddish in color, and are covered in areolas from which small, sharp spines emerge. This cactus blooms in springtime, and its flowers can be white, pink, yellow, or red. The Hatiora is a fairly easy plant to care for, and is therefore a popular choice for beginner gardeners. When it comes to watering, the Hatiora should be watered about every three to five days during the summer months. The soil should be slightly dry in between waterings. It is harmful to the plant to allow the soil to completely dry out, as well as to allow the plant to sit in water. When watering, the water should be allowed to drain out of the drainage holes, but any water that remains in the saucer should be immediately poured out. From October to December, watering should be reduced to about once a week.

Fertilizing and Nutritient

About fertilizer. The fertilizer should be high in potassium for best results in flowering. During growth, 1-2 times a month, feed the plant. In winter, hatiora should be placed in cool conditions and not fertilized for about 2 months. The soil should be almost dry.

Reproduction

How to reproduce Hatiora? When taking cuttings from a Hatiora plant, allow a small amount of drying time before placing the cutting in a mixture of peat and sand. The Hatiora will easily root this way. If you wish to propagate Hatiora by seed, wait until spring and sow the seeds.

Bloom

Why Hatiora won't bloom? Unless it's a cactus, most plants bloom during spring. The Hatiora plant is an exception as it blooms during winter and spring. What's more, its flowers are located at the end of the shoots. They're small and yellow, and they give way to semi-transparent berries with red tips. There are other species of Hatiora with larger red and pink flowers.

Transfer or Repotting

How much I must water Hatiora? The plant is a cactus and should be transplanted after flowering in March – April every 2-3 years. The cactus does not like to be transplanted and should be done so carefully.

Caring The Hatiora

How to care the plant? Because this plant is an epiphyte, it grows in hanging baskets and does not like drafts. The branches of the plant are quite fragile and break easily, so it is important to handle them with care. It is also necessary to periodically wipe the shoots with a damp cloth. In summer, the plant should be placed in the shade or on a balcony.

Pests & Challenges

What is the challenge when caring Hatiora plant? Common problems are mealybugs, spider mites, bud and flower drop, and light spots on segments. Slow branching can be a problem when the plant isn't getting enough light. Hatiora may also rot from too much water.

Toxic & Poisonous Type

Are Hatiora poisonous? If a person or animal ingests any part of this plant, it can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach pain. If the plant is ingested in large quantities, it can be fatal.